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Lemon and Lime curd

Saturday, March 31st, 2007

Lemon curd is a British spread with a lovely tart and lemony flavour. In my own variant I use both lime and lemon, which makes a perfect combination. The curd can be used on toasts and muffins or as filling in cakes and desserts. It’s very simple to make lemon curd and I strongly recommend doing it yourself instead of buying a jar in the store, which is filled with preservatives and other nasty ingredients. If you use fresh eggs and butter and sterilize the jar, the curd will keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks.

    Lemon and Lime curd
    (makes about 450 ml – one big jar)

    75 gram butter
    2 eggs
    finely grated zest from 1 lime and 1 lemon
    fresh juice from 2 lemons and 1 lime
    200 gram caster sugar

    Beat the butter and sugar with an electric beater. Add the eggs, one at a time while beating. Add the zest and juice. At this point the mixture will look like it’s curdled but don’t worry as it will smooth out when the butter melts.
    Simmer the mixture on low heat, stirring constantly to prevent it from curdling. Make sure to use a wooden spoon, otherwise your mixture can become discoloured. After 15 minutes your curd will be rather thick and now it’s time to pour it into a hot sterilized jar. The curd will thicken more when it cools. Keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks.

    Note: There are several recipes/methods on how to cook lemon curd. When cooking lemon curd with egg whites you sometimes can get lumps of curdled egg as egg whites cook at a rather low temperature. For some reason if you beat the butter, sugar and eggs as written above you avoid this problem.

Rhubarb Syrup

Sunday, June 26th, 2005

Rhubarb Syrup

What to do with all lovely rhubarb after all different pies and jams that I’ve made? What about Rhubarb syrup for refreshing drinks in the summer? For children, add water to the syrup and all adults feel free to mix it with vodka instead :-)

    Rhubarb syrup
    (makes about one bottle, 0,4 litre)

    0.5 kg rhubarb (trimmed and well washed)
    1.75 dl water
    500 grams of sugar for each litre of syrup
    1 tsp vanilla essenced sugar (or a small piece of a vanilla pod, as usual I didn’t have any at home).
    1 tsp citrid acid

    Cut the rhubarb in small pieces and boil it with the water for about 10 minutes, until the rhubarb becomes really soft. Strain the mixture through a clean kitchen towel. Measure the rhubarb syrup and add sugar. In my case I got 3.75 deciliters of liquid and therefore I used 190 gram sugar ( 500/10 = 50 gram per deciliter –> 50 * 3.75 = 187. 50 grams sugar). Add citrid acid and bring everything to boil, let it simmer for 5 minutes. Skim the foam from the surface and pour the syrup into a hot and sterilised bottle. Keep the syrup in the fridge. When thirsty, pour some of the syrup in a glass and add water and ice, or mix it with something stronger….

Rhubarb and Strawberry Jam with vanilla

Sunday, June 26th, 2005

More rhubarb jam, this time together with strawberries…

    Rhubarb and Strawberry Jam with vanilla

    0,5 kg rhubarb (washed, rinsed, peeled and cut)
    0,5 kg strawberries (washed, rinsed and cut)
    700 gram caster sugar
    jucie from 1 lemon
    one vanilla pod (cut in half lenghtwise)
    1 tsp citric acid

    Place the rhubarb and the strawberries in a bowl, add the juice. Scrape the interior of the vanilla pod with the point of a knife and add both seeds and pod. Stir everything, then cover and set aside at room temperature for some hours and then the fridge over the night.Put a small plate in the freezer. Drain the fruits and pour the juice into a large saucepan. Scrape any undissolved sugar into the pan. Bring the mixture to boil and then add the fruit. Bring back to a boil, reduce the heat and boil for about 25 minutes. To see if the jam is ready, take out the plate from the freezer and put a spoonful of jam on it. If the jam doesn’t set just continue with the boiling. Skim the foam from the surface, remove the vanilla pod and add the citric acid. Don’t let the jam continue boiling after the acid is added. Pour the jam into clean and hot jars. Store in the fridge.


Skim the foam from the surface to avoid bacterias.

Rhubarb Mania

Thursday, June 23rd, 2005

Tanuki and a batch of rhubarb jam.

(I’ve had major problems with the computer lately, I got my new one last week and after a few days the hard drive got mad and the whole computer died at the same time as Fredrik’s computer started to give us a hard time. So we had to put back my really old computer while waiting for the others to get fixed. Anyway, that’s why I havn’t posted anything during the last week).

Caramel rhubarb tart before baking, after baking and before tasting :-)

I thought that I would post about rhubarb again, there’s been a lot of rhubarb in our house lately (Nigella’s cornmeal cake times 2, pies etc). I received more fresh rhubarb from my brother’s garden and the first thing I did was the rhubarb caramel tart that Anne posted… Mmm, so yummy :-) Thanks Anne for posting the recipe. Then I did jam… Lovely and delicious rhubarb jam, that I’ll make a new batch of during the weekend. Poor Fredrik is probably thinking about escaping from home just because of the rhubarb, actually he isn’t especially fond of it. But he has enjoyed all rhubarb creations, at least he said so :-)


Close up of rhubarb jam.


Rhubarb jam, my first batch ever!

    Rhubarb Jam

    1 kg rhubarb
    750 gram caster sugar
    juice from 1 lemon
    jucie from 1 lime
    vanilla sugar (or essence or a half vanilla pod, I forgot to buy a vanilla pod so I just took some vanilla essenced sugar)
    1 tsp citric acid

    Wash, peel and cut the rhubarb into rather small pieces. Place the rhubarb in a bowl, add the juices and the vanilla. Stir everything, then cover and set aside at room temperature for 20 hours.
    Put a small plate in the freezer. Drain the rhubarb and pour the juice into a large saucepan. Scrape any undissolved sugar into the pan. Bring the mixture to boil and then add the rhubarb. Bring back to a boil, reduce the heat and boil for about 25 minutes. To see if the jam is ready, take out the plate from the freezer and put a spoonful of jam on it. If the jam doesn’t set just continue with the boiling. Skim the scum from the surface and add the citric acid. Don’t let the jam continue boiling after the acid is added. Pour the jam into clean and hot jars. Store in the fridge.

The story about the red apple and the green pear

Friday, May 20th, 2005

Apple and Pear jam

This is a story about a pretty green pear and a lovely red apple that fell in love a pan. With some sugar, cinnamon and lime they ended up as a delicious Apple and Pear jam… Mmm…

*****

    Apple and Pear jam
    1 small jar

    1 apple and 1 pear (a total of 200 gr rinsed and peeled fruit)
    200 gr jam sugar (contains sugar, lemon acid, apple pectin and Sodium benzoate)
    3 tsp lime juice
    1 tbsp brown sugar
    0.5 tsp cinnamon
    100 ml water

    Start with putting a small plate in the freezer. Rinse, peel and chop the fruit. Put the fruit, water and sugar in a pan and boil rapidly. Boil until the setting point is reached, about 15 minutes. To see if the jam is ready, take out the plate from the freezer and put a spoonful of jam on it. If the jam doesn’t set just continue with the cooking. Pour the jam into a clean jar when ready.

    *****

SHF#8: Lime and Orange Marmalade with Grand Marnier

Friday, May 20th, 2005

I havn’t participated in any food blog event for a while so I thought I would take part in this month’s Sugar High Friday #8 with the theme “Pucker up with citrus!” hosted by Alice at My Adventures at the Breadbox. Fredrik has the digital camera as he’s attending the E3 expo and conference in Los Angeles this week so therefore the photo was taken with my cellphone (= bad quality).

My original plan was to make a pie or at least to bake something for SHF#8, but lately I’ve felt an urge for making my own jam and it seems like every food blogger is making jam. So I decided to go for a citrus marmalade. I don’t really know what to say about the result because actually I’m not especially fond of citrus marmalade in the first place as I prefer strawberries and other fruits. I like the taste of the marmalade alot but the lime peels are a bit too hard and I don’t know why (but I do hope that they will soften up a bit) . The orange peels are soft and nice, so maybe the limes requires longer cooking. Does anyone have any ideas? My brother that got a jar of the marmalade when he was here this week said that it’s delicious (apart from the hard lime…) and that he could eat it just as it is.

The morning after I had made my marmalade I saw “Obachans” pretty orange jam and I realized that I didn’t can my jars. She cooked her filled jam jars and I’m wondering how important that is? Before I made my jam I looked at Swedish recipes and there was nothing written about it there, besides from cleaning and pouring cooking water into the jars before filling them with the jam.

Anyway, here’s the recipe. Makes two small jars.

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Lime and Orange Marmalade with Grand Marnier


2 limes and1 orange (a total of 400 gr of citrus)
400 gr jam sugar (contains sugar, lemon acid, apple pectin and Sodium benzoate )
150 ml water
50 ml Grand Marnier (which is a orange flavored cognac based liqueur)

Start with putting a small plate in the freezer. Scrub the citrus fruits and then slice and cut them thinly. Put the fruit, water and sugar in a pan and boil rapidly. Boil until the setting point is reached, about 15 minutes. To see if the marmalade is ready, take out the plate from the freezer and put a spoonful of marmalade on it. If the marmalade doesn’t set just continue with the cooking. Pour the marmalade into clean jars when ready.

Serve with ice cream, on bread or just eat it as it is :-)

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