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Archive for December, 2005

Merry Christmas!

Saturday, December 24th, 2005

Merry Christmas dear readers! I wish you all the best. I’m at my mother’s, preparing the last things for Christmas dinner which will start in an hour. Yes, in Sweden and Poland we celebrate Christmas today on Christmas Eve. I will take photos of the food and tell you all about our typical Polish Christmas food during the coming days.

Take care! And have a wonderful Christmas with your dear ones!drivers usb actions device mp3james donload blunt mp3 197312 mp3 stones001 mp3 encodermp3 avalon 96chevy mp3 571975 baptist mp3 hymnaleditor forum 8 mp3 1st tag 5 Map

The Nobel Banquet

Saturday, December 10th, 2005

Today, December 10th, is the anniversary of Alfred Nobel’s death. Since 1901 the Nobel Prizes have been presented to the Laureates at ceremonies on this day. I will not write about the Nobel Price here, but you can read about it on the official homepage. But I will mention a few words about the Nobel Banquet that follows the ceremonies.

The Nobel Banquet is held for about 1300 guests, among them the Nobel Laureates with their families, Their Majesties the King and Queen and other members of the Royal Family of Sweden. There are of course other important guests there as well. The Nobel dinner is luxurious and the menu is not revealed until 7 p.m the same day as the Banquet is, and that was just a few minutes ago. You can read this year’s menu further down in this post; it is always presented in French but an English translation is added as well.

The responsible Banquet staff consists of 280 people: 156 waiters/waitresses, 52 wine waiters, 33 chefs/pastry chefs/cold buffet manageresses, 18 washer-ups and 5 head waiters. The Nobel Banquet demands careful organization as all 1300 guests have to get their warm food at the same time. It takes the staff 6 minutes to carry out the food from the kitchen to the guests!! The different dishes are started to be served at very specific times: the starter is served at 7.18 pm, the main course is served at 8.20 pm, the dessert is served at 9.21 pm and afterwards the dancing begins at about 10.30 pm. I don’t know about you, but it’s amazing that the staff manages to serve all their 1300 guests in such a short time as 6 minutes.

The first Nobel Banquet in 1901 was attended by 113 male guests. The first female guest didn’t appear until two years later, in the shape of Polish Marie Curie who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, sharing it with her husband Pierre Curie and Henri Becquerel. During the years the guests have increased, but as long as the Nobel Banquet will be held in the Stockholm City Hall they won’t increase as there is no more space.

    Menu from the Nobel Banquet 2005

    Pannacotta d´écrevisses avec omble chevalier,
    coquilles Saint-Jacques et langoustines

    Poitrine de perdrix des neiges
    en robe forestière et sa garniture,
    gâteau de pommes de terre,
    sauce Normande

    Mousse citronnée garnie de framboises,
    coulis de framboises arctiques

    VINS
    Pommery Grand Cru Vintage 1995
    Champagne

    Penfolds RWT 2001
    Barossa Valley

    Le Dauphin de Guiraud 2002
    Sauternes

    Café
    Remy Martin VSOP
    Cointreau

    Eau minérale Ramlösa

    Translation in English:

    Crayfish panna cotta with fennel-baked Arctic char, scallops and Norway lobster on baby lettuce

    Ptarmigan breast baked in horn of plenty mushrooms with caramelised apples, poached onions and broad beans, served with Calvados sauce and potato cake

    Lemon and yoghurt mousse with Arctic bramble marmalade, fresh raspberries and raspberry-Arctic bramble sauce

If you want your mouth to water even more you can read all earlier menus starting from 1901 here. And more information about the Banquet can be found here.

To this day no cat has been invited to the Nobel Banquet which is a pity as my cats would love some Crayfish panna cotta. But I guess that we’ll just watch the whole Banquet on TV, because it’s a really big event and thus shown live on Swedish TV.

Weekend Cat Blogging #27

Saturday, December 10th, 2005

Which cat is Tanuki and which are the fake ones?
Which is the real cat and which are the fake ones?

It’s time for weekend cat blogging again. Each weekend food Bloggers around the world share pictures of their cute cats. Just send your permalink in a comment to Clare at Eat Stuff and add a “Weekend Cat Blogging” tag to your post.

14 days left to Christmas Eve. Christmas gifts have to be bought and then wrapped. But why do the cats always come and lay down in front of you, on the gifts and the wrapping paper so that you can’t get anything done? I love my cats anyway, but I don’t want end up wrapping the cats instead of the gifts which easily can be made. Especially since some of the gifts are fake furry stuffed toy cats.

Gingerbread Toffee

Monday, December 5th, 2005

Gingerbread Toffee

More toffee? Has the girl (or cat) gone crazy? Well, I just had to try this recipe. And the result? It tastes like Gingerbread dough, yummy! You’re probably wondering why I just don’t eat Gingerbread dough instead if it tastes the same, but raw cookie dough probably isn’t good for your stomach. Not as good as sugar!!

    Gingerbread Toffee
    (makes about 30-40 toffees)

    100 ml double/whipping cream
    50 ml golden syrup
    100 ml sugar
    1 tsp Gingerbread spice (or just mix ground cloves, ground cinnamon and ground ginger. Just make sure that you get 1 tsp in total.)
    1 tbsp butter

    Mix all the ingredients in a saucepan. Stir occasionally and boil without lid for 15-60 minutes, until the toffee batter is 122-125 ° C. If you don’t have a thermometer you can do a ball test: at that temperature a drop of the batter should solidify in water and be possible to be rolled into a little ball. On my stove this batter took 15 minutes to cook on a rather low temperature.

    Put greaseproof paper on a baking sheet and grease it with unsalted butter. Pour the toffee carefully on the greaseproof paper and let it cool. Cut in pieces with a scissor and wrap each toffee individually with greaseproof paper.

    This recipe makes a small amount of toffee and your baking sheet will probably be too large for this amount of toffee batter. To avoid getting too thin toffees just do like I did: I folded edges on my paper, making a kind of form. Then I poured the toffee batter into the greased paper form.

Christmas Toffee

Sunday, December 4th, 2005

Chocolate and Lemon Toffee

Time flies and today it’s already second Advent, thus 2 candles of 4 should be lit. I finally managed to find the Advent candlestick but I had to put it away during the week as we had a photographer here to take photos of our home for our appartment ad. And now, of course, I can’t find it again. But at least the appartment is really neat and clean :-)

It’s only 20 days left to Christmas Eve and in Sweden it is very common to make toffee before Christmas. I never did that when I was a child, we didn’t have that tradition in my Polish family. But we did toffee at school and I recall that everything got really sticky. Anyway, yesterday I did Chocolate toffee and Lemon toffee, which both turned out really delicous. I found the recipes at a forum that I read regularly, but they can be found anywhere on the internet or in Swedish cookbooks.

    Lemon Toffee
    (makes about 70 toffees)

    300 ml double/whipping cream
    200 ml golden syrup
    300 ml caster sugar
    2 tbsp butter
    juice and zest from 1 lemon

    about 70 small toffee paper forms

    Put the toffee forms on a tray.
    Mix all the ingredients in a saucepan. Stir occasionally and boil without lid for 15-60 minutes, until the toffee batter is 122-125 ° C. If you don’t have a thermometer you can do a ball test: at that temperature a drop of the batter should solidify in water and be possible to be rolled into a little ball.

    Pour the toffee carefully into each paper form. Repeat with all toffee batter. Store the toffee in a tin with greaseproof paper between each layer.

    Chocolate Toffee
    (makes about 30 toffees)

    100 ml golden syrup
    200 ml caster sugar
    4 tbsp butter
    4 tbsp cocoa

    about 30 small toffee paper forms

    Put the toffee forms on a tray.
    Mix all the ingredients in a saucepan. Stir occasionally and boil without lid for 15-60 minutes, until the toffee batter is 122-125 ° C. If you don’t have a thermometer you can do a ball test: at that temperature a drop of the batter should solidify in water and be possible to be rolled into a little ball.

    Pour the toffee carefully into each paper form. Repeat with all toffee batter. Store the toffee in a tin with greaseproof paper between each layer.